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Sustainability Planning Part Three: Developing a sustainability plan

This post is part of a series of blogs on program sustainability and sustainability planning. Read the pervious posts, What is sustainability? And Components of Community Work.

I’ll be honest. I loooove planning models. When I embarked on researching models for PlanSustaindevelopingsustainability plans and did not find a pretty step model- I was disappointed. Though when it comes down to it, planning is planning! So this blog post, rather than providing a step model or planning process, summarizes important points and advice for sustainability planning.

  • Like evaluation planning, planning for sustainability should be done as early in the program development process as possible. The office of Adolescent Health has identified eight key factors1 that influence whether a service, program or its activities – and therefore community benefit- will be sustained over time.
  1. There is an action strategy or program plan
  2. An environmental scan or assessment was conducted
  3. The program is adaptable
  4. The program has community support
  5. The program can be integrated in community infrastructures
  6. There is a leadership team
  7. Strategic partnerships have been created
  8. Diverse funding sources have been secured
  • As mentioned in my first blog post, sustainability planning should focus on community need: therefore assessing the environment is critical. Look at community readiness, local demographics and existing services1. Also assess the financial and political environments. Look internally as well, assessing your own organizational environment such as leadership, staffing and infrastructure1.
  • Like any comprehensive program plan, a sustainability plan contains goals, objectives, action steps, timelines, roles1 and metrics for tracking progress on each action step2.  It should be a living plan that is regularly re-visited1.
  • In your sustainability plan, consider the four components of sustainability discussed in the second post in this series: the issue, the programs, the behaviour change, and the partnership 3.
  • Share your success! Increase the visibility of your work in the community, through the media, conference workshops, publishing case studies etc. Develop a marketing strategy that promotes the success/results of your program as well as the program itself4.
 
References
  1. Office of Adolescent Health, 2014. Building Sustainable Programs: The Framework.
  2. Calhoun, Mainor, Moreland-Russell, Maier, Brossart and Luke. Using the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool to Assess and Plan for Sustainability. Preventing Chronic Disease 2014; 11:130185
  3. Heart Health Resource Centre, 1999. @heart: Heart Health Sustainability. Toronto, Ontario
  4. Office of Adolescent Health, 2012. Build to Last: Planning Programmatic Sustainability.
Sustainability Planning Part Two: the Components o...
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