HC Link - Uncategorized http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/categories/uncategorized.html Mon, 22 May 2017 21:06:19 -0400 en-gb Just Add Bikes! How cycling can help build a healthy, vibrant community http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/just-add-bikes-how-cycling-can-help-build-a-healthy-vibrant-community-1.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/just-add-bikes-how-cycling-can-help-build-a-healthy-vibrant-community-1.html

By: Sue Shikaze, Health Promoter, Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit

“Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race” H.G. Wells


While it might be a stretch to claim that the bicycle can solve all the ails of the world, it can certainly be one solution to many challenges facing communities today. Making communities bicycle-friendly and getting more people on bikes can address issues of public health, safety, air quality, and traffic congestion. Cycling is a healthy, economical and sustainable transportation option as well as an attractor for tourism and economic development. It is an important quality of life feature that many people look for when choosing where to live, work or play. Not everyone can afford a car or wants to drive and a good cycling environment offers more mobility options. And let’s not forget: cycling is fun!

bikesmeanbusiness

Biking attracts people and brings business to the community


Evidence indicates that there is demand and need for improved conditions for cycling in Ontario. A 2014 poll conducted by the Share the Road Cycling Coalition indicated that 32% of Ontarians cycle at least once a month and 54% of Ontarians said they would like to cycle more often. What would most encourage people to cycle more often is better infrastructure, such as bike lanes and trails.1 The Ontario Medical Association recognizes cycling as an important solution to help address rising rates of chronic diseases associated with physical inactivity. They advocate for better and safer infrastructure in urban, suburban and rural settings, and that, “much more must be done by provincial and municipal transportation departments to make this form of exercise safer.”2

So what does a bicycle-friendly community look like? Assessment of the cycling environment is typically done around the “5 E’s”: engineering, education, encouragement, enforcement and evaluation and planning. These indicators address the range of needs to accommodate cycling.

Engineering refers to on-the-ground facilities and infrastructure. Good cycling facilities are carefully planned, designed and maintained to accommodate bicycles safely, conveniently and comfortably. A well-planned cycling network has good connectivity between routes and destinations, as well as things like secure bike parking and bike racks on buses to provide inter-modal connections. Facilities could include on-road accommodations such as designated bike lanes, separated cycle tracks or paved shoulders, or off-road paths and trails. There are also innovative design treatments such as bike boxes, which provide a designated space for cyclists to wait at an intersection, separated from cars.

greenbikelane
Green bike lane being installed in Thunder Bay


Education needs to address both cyclists and motorists to ensure that they know how to safely share the road. The goal of public education programs is to increase the knowledge and awareness of all road users on their rights and responsibilities, as well as to build practical skills. Education initiatives can include cycling skills workshops, share the road campaigns and tip sheets.

sharetheroad

Share the road promotion – an example of education


Encouragement initiatives are intended to get more people on bikes and to normalize cycling as a viable activity for both transportation and recreation. While it may be true that “if you build it, they will come”, many people still need encouragement to get rolling. Encouragement includes promoting the benefits of cycling, and of places and opportunities to cycle. Initiatives such as the Commuter Challenge, Active and Safe Routes to School and SMART Trips give information and incentives to support and encourage people to cycle more often. Cycling maps, signage and clubs are also ways that communities encourage cycling.

Enforcement ensures that all road users follow the rules of the road and share the road safely. In addition to traditional methods such as issuing tickets and fines, enforcement can also include education and public relations programs that remind cyclists and motorists of their responsibilities under the law. Recent updates to the Highway Traffic Act are intended to improve safety for cyclists, including the requirement for motorists to leave at least 1 metre of space when passing a cyclist, increased fines for dooring a cyclist and increased fines for cyclists who don’t use lights when needed.

Evaluation and planning refers to having systems in place to evaluate current activities and programs, and planning for the future. Becoming a more bicycle-friendly community is a process that requires ongoing measurement and monitoring in order to identify and meet future needs. The amount of cycling taking place, rate of crashes, and economic impact are all aspects of tracking progress. The development of a Cycling Master Plan is a key tool for planning, implementation and evaluation.

Plus a ‘P’: Partnerships

Cycling has multiple benefits for communities and can help address many issues including health, economic development, environment, sustainability and equity. Potential partners who have an interest in cycling include municipalities, public health, law enforcement, schools, community organizations, cycling clubs and committees, workplaces, business community, tourism and economic development, trails and environmental groups. Different partners have different skills, knowledge and resources; no one group can do it completely on its own.

If you are looking for an opportunity to learn more about making your community bicycle-friendly, meet other like-minded professionals and find out about innovative cycling initiatives, consider attending the annual Ontario Bike Summit hosted by the Share the Road Cycling Coalition. It is THE premier cycling networking and professional development event in Ontario. Whether you are an advocate or elected official, a professional in planning, transportation, health, tourism or economic development, there is something for you at OBS to get informed and inspired.

The 9th annual Ontario Bike Summit takes place on April 11 & 12 at the Eaton Chelsea in Toronto. This year’s theme is “Just Add Bikes: The role of cycling in urban mobility and community building”. The agenda features speakers from across Ontario and North America who will share successes for building bicycle-friendly communities. Presentation themes will include advocacy best practices, risk management, complete streets implementation and more. You will also hear from municipal and provincial elected officials about why cycling matters to them. Keynote and workshop sessions are carefully curated by a panel of professionals with cycling expertise from across the province, and selected to create a program that features the most innovative, current, and state-of-the-art initiatives for cycling. Sessions address issues and opportunities that are most relevant to communities, from policy to implementation to evaluation.

The Ontario Bike Summit has put cycling firmly on the radar of decision-makers at all levels of government. Find the 2017 draft agenda, registration information and more details at http://www.sharetheroad.ca/ontario-bike-summit-p157286 

pre summit

Participants in the pre-summit bike tour led by the City of Toronto.

 

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About Share the Road:
The Share the Road Cycling Coalition is Ontario’s premier cycling advocacy organization working to build a bicycle-friendly Ontario – a place where a cyclist of any age or ability can ride safely, wherever they need to go. Share the Road works with municipal, provincial and federal governments, the business community, public health practitioners, road safety and other not-for-profit organizations to enhance access, improve safety and educate the public about the value and importance of safe cycling for healthy lifestyles and healthy communities. www.sharetheroad.ca

 

1 Share the Road Cycling Coalition, (March 2014), polling conducted by Stratcom Communications
2 Ontario Medical Association, (2011), Policy Paper: Enhancing Cycling Safety in Ontario.

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kalderson@parentactionondrugs.org (Kyley) Uncategorized Thu, 09 Mar 2017 15:01:02 -0500
Working Towards Zero -- Together http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/working-towards-zero-together.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/working-towards-zero-together.html
 
This post is part of a blog series leading up to Canada’s Vision Zero Summit on November 29, 2016. Learn more about Sweden’s Vision Zero approach and Parachute’s Canadian approach.

It struck me that the first panel at the Vison Zero Summit this morning was really about partnership. Partnership, of course, is a topic dear to the hearts of health promoters everywhere, so to hear its critical importance emphasized by speakers as varied as City Councillor and Chair of the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee, Jaye Robinson, event sponsor, State Farm, and transportation experts from Sweden and the USA was heartening indeed.

To reach zero road deaths, we need a collective effort. Every speaker this morning was clear: transport experts, planners, public health, educators, and all levels of government -- city, province, national (and even beyond) -- even car companies -- need to work together. Just as cooperation at every level was necessary for the near-elimination of polio worldwide, so too will it be necessary for Vision Zero to succeed.

Ian Grossman (@AAMVAConnection), of the Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, talked about the challenge they had in the US getting transport people and public health into the same room when they were working on the reaching consensus while working on the Toward Zero Deaths report (http://www.towardzerodeaths.org/). Then they needed to decide whether to include only the small interventions that they knew would lead to large changes in road deaths or to have an all-inclusive document including smaller contributors to change, so that everyone could see themselves in the report. The all-inclusive approach won out and (as well as the report) they created an online database of resources and interventions (http://www.towardzerodeaths.org/resources/) at all levels, available to anyone.

Near the end of the session there was a question: What should Canada do? Should we work nationally? provincially? At the city level? The answer: Yes, yes, yes. We have to work at all levels, together, to reach zero road deaths – because one is too many.
 
This post is part of a blog series leading up to Canada’s Vision Zero Summit on November 29, 2016. Learn more about Sweden’s Vision Zero approach and Parachute’s Canadian approach.

HC Link’s blog series on Vision Zero
 
 
Looking to learn more about Vision Zero?
Sweden’s Vision Zero Website http://www.visionzeroinitiative.com/
Parachute’s Vision Zero Website http://www.parachutecanada.org/visionzero
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r.kalda@healthnexus.ca (Robyn) Uncategorized Tue, 29 Nov 2016 13:02:27 -0500
Public Health and Vision Zero: What role do we have to play? http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/public-health-and-vision-zero-what-role-do-we-have-to-play.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/public-health-and-vision-zero-what-role-do-we-have-to-play.html
By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

This post is part of a blog series leading up to Canada’s Vision Zero Summit on November 29, 2016. Learn more about Sweden’s Vision Zero approach and Parachute’s Canadian approach.

Today I’m live tweeting and blogging from Parachute’s Vision Zero Summit. It’s not quite 11 am but already I’m on fire for Vision Zero and everything that it stands for. In particular, I’m really reflecting on the role that public health can play within an initiative such as Vision Zero. Today’s conference opened with a video address by Dr Matts-Ake Belin from Sweden, where Vision Zero originates. Dr Belin proposed that public health and Vision Zero take opposite approaches: that public health starts with a problem that needs to be solved and applies intervention to address the problem, whereas Vision Zero starts with the vision of what needs to be achieved. Dr David Sleet, formerly from the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and now a consultant, spoke about the role for public health in Vision Zero. Dr Sleet believes that traffic injuries and deaths are the number one public health issue of our time. Advances in road safety is listed as #10 on the CDC’s list of 10 Great Public Health Achievements in the 20th Century.

Dr Sleet asked the audience who among us work in public health. While about 10 percent of the audience raised their hands, Dr Sleet told us that today, we all work in public health because what we are doing here at the Vision Zero Summit is public health’s mandate the save lives and prevent deaths. Dr Sleet proposes that public health approach road safety in the same way as we do infectious diseases- like infection disease on wheels- by bringing the epidemiological and education lenses that we apply to outbreaks such as e-coli and Zika. In fact public health has a history of initiatives that focus on reducing to zero, such as polio.
 
VZ 1

While fellow panelist Ian Grossman from the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators stated that one of the challenges in the US has been to form connections between those who work in road safety and public health, here in Ontario public health professionals are used to working intersectorally and making a difference in their communities.  While there is a role for public health, Dr Sleet stated that Vision Zero should be everyone’s vision and should involve every sector.

HC Link’s blog series on Vision Zero
 
Looking to learn more about Vision Zero?

Sweden’s Vision Zero Website http://www.visionzeroinitiative.com/
Parachute’s Vision Zero Website http://www.parachutecanada.org/visionzero
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a.bodkin@healthnexus.ca (Andrea Bodkin) Uncategorized Tue, 29 Nov 2016 12:44:39 -0500
Water Does Wonders in Humber-Downsview http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/water-does-wonders-in-humber-downsview-1.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/water-does-wonders-in-humber-downsview-1.html

HC Link is proud to be a part of the Healthy Kids Community Challenge (HKCC) by supporting the 45 participating communities across Ontario. The current theme that HKCC communities are supporting right now is “Water Does Wonders”, which emphasizes choosing water over sugar sweetened beverages. Many of the communities are involved in activities that promote water consumption, such as providing refillable water bottles, community swims, and refill stations. In this post, Myriam Castilla, Local Project Manager for Toronto-Humber-Downsview, shares how they are incorporating Water Does Wonders into their local work.

I am eager to share with all of you one of the exciting Water does Wonders activities that is happening here in the Humber-Downsview community.

Annually, from the first week of July to the third week of August, the Youth Association for Academics Athletics and Character Education (YAAACE), runs a Summer Institute camp for 400 children from the Humber-Downsview community. Most of these children belong to the City of Toronto Neighborhood Investment Areas where a large amount of the population experiences high levels of inequity and poor health.

This year, in partnership with HKCC, YAAACE decided to adopt HKCC’s theme "Water does Wonders" as a main subject for their Summer Institute. The curriculum for this camp was developed to promote Water does Wonders message; 25 teachers were trained on HKCC’s objectives, principles, and strategies to promote water intake; and 50 youth staff were trained on water facts and strategies to promote healthy drink choices among children.

In addition, YAAACE adopted a Healthy Eating policy; which includes having servings of fruits and vegetables in their lunches and snacks, and that only tap water is available during camp’s activities. To re-enforce this message, all sugary drinks were removed from vending machines in their premises.

What is unique about YAAACE’s initiatives is that this community organization uses an innovative social inclusion model to support children and youth from low income communities to grow, learn and play in an environment that is responsive and supportive of their needs, interests, expectations, and aspirations. It offers access to programs that integrate academic, athletic, social and artistic activities through school, after school programs, weekend programs, and camps. 

YAAACE’s academic activities target students who fall below the provincial standards in literacy and in numeracy due to multiple factors, including exposure to violence or trauma. To ensure child success, with the support of mentors, YAAACE’s programs coordinate with children’s schools and caregivers.

We are thrilled because of the impact of the Summer Institute in this community; the key messages of Water does Wonders has been widely disseminated, and 400 children are receiving the messages in a culturally relevant form, and clearly changing their behavior towards enjoying drinking tap water and eating more fruits and vegetables.

WDW 1

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a.bodkin@healthnexus.ca (Andrea Bodkin) Uncategorized Wed, 24 Aug 2016 15:18:12 -0400
Moving Ahead on Rural and Community Transportation: March 29th, 2016 Forum http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/moving-ahead-on-rural-and-community-transportation-march-29th-2016-forum.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/moving-ahead-on-rural-and-community-transportation-march-29th-2016-forum.html By Lisa Tolentino, HC Link Community Consultant

On March 29th, 2016 HC Link partnered with the Rural Ontario Institute (ROI), Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition (OHCC) and Routes Connecting Communities to organize and host a forum for rural and community transportation stakeholders. Moving Ahead on Rural and Community Transportation was held to enable participants to share experiences and lessons learned, and help support peer-to-peer networking. Significant steps are being taken by many municipalities and other stakeholders to improve community transportation in rural areas around Ontario. Representatives from diverse organizations that are implementing community transportation initiatives were in attendance as over 100 people from across the province attended both in-person and online, via live-streaming/webinar.

RuralTransportationForum
Things kicked off with an exercise to provide opportunities for networking and to get to know who was in the room, and online. The majority of participants represented municipal and regional government, followed by the non-profit sector. Others working within the private and education sectors were also in attendance. Representatives attended from the following regions and districts:

•Grey-Bruce                      

• Haliburton

• Hastings

• Kawartha Lakes

• Kenora (Dryden)

• Lambton (Sarnia)

• Lanark

• Leeds and Grenville (Brockville)

• Lennox-Addington

• Muskoka 

• Niagara

• Norfolk

• Nipissing

• Northumberland

• Perth County (Stratford)

• Peterborough

• Simcoe

• Timiskaming

• Wellington/Waterloo

• York (Georgina)

A presentation was then given by Cathy Wilkinson from Routes Connecting Communities, which is a transportation provider serving the northern part of York Region. Their volunteer drivers use their own vehicles to provide available, accessible and affordable transportation to people who are restricted due to life circumstances such as financial hardship, health issues, and geographic, social or cultural isolation.

Cathy’s presentation was followed by a panel discussion with three other transportation service providers in the province, including: 1) Brad Smith from Ride Norfolk, 2) Heather Inwood-Montrose from The Rural Overland Utility Transit (TROUT), and 3) Rick Williams from Muskoka Extended Transit (MET). The panelists focused on sharing the challenges and successes that they have experienced in delivering public transit in their respective areas.

Next the Ministry of Transportation offered an overview of what Community Transportation (CT) is to them, and highlighted a few examples of initiatives that they are currently funding across the province. This is a $2 million, 2-year pilot grant program to provide financial assistance to Ontario municipalities for the development and implementation of community transportation initiatives. As part of the CT Program, 22 municipalities have undertaken projects to either start or expand collaborative projects in their regions. MTO representatives also announced that they will soon be supporting communities around the province with increased networking and engagement opportunities with respect to Community Transportation.

 Following lunch, participants broke into small groups to discuss five topics:

  1. Building Community Support - demonstrating the need and/or making the case for community transportation

  2. Collaboration & Partnership Building - managing different organizational mandates and moving forward

  3. Revenue Generation & Funding - using both traditional and innovative or creative approaches to generating funds

  4. Marketing & Promotion - of new and/or existing transportation services

  5. Technology - procuring vehicles, using integrated software, and other forms of technology

The day ended with a live streaming presentation by Caryn Souza from the Community Transportation Association of America (CTAA). The CTAA consists of organizations and individuals who support mobility for all Americans regardless of where they live or work. Their membership includes community transit providers, public transit agencies, organizations providing health care and/or employment services, government, college and university planners, private bus companies, taxi operators, people concerned with the special mobility needs of those with disabilities, manufacturers and many other organizations who share a commitment to mobility. Caryn explained that there are many different programs that the CTAA is currently involved in, from mobility management to transit planning and ridesharing across the nation.

Overall, the day was full of information about Community Transportation in both Ontario and across the USA. Participants said that it was great to be in a room with others who have the same struggles as they do, and that they had the opportunity to learn from one another and as well as brainstorm solutions. Many said that they were able to foster connections with other people working on-the-ground and that they learned something that they will be able to apply in their own communities. HC Link was also pleased to have had the chance to help facilitate this group of passionate and committed people!

If you would like more information about this event, please contact Lisa Tolentino, Community Transportation Network Coordinator, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

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Lisa@ohcc-ccso.ca (Lisa Tolentino) Uncategorized Thu, 28 Apr 2016 21:30:23 -0400
Coming Together for Active Living in Kirkland Lake and Area http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/coming-together-for-active-living-in-kirkland-lake-and-area.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/coming-together-for-active-living-in-kirkland-lake-and-area.html Guest Post by Kristin Berfelz, of the Physical Activity Resource Centre (PARC)


On Thursday November 26th, 2015 PARC (the Physical Activity Resource Centre) joined several community members from Kirkland Lake and surrounding area to discuss making active living the easy choice for everyone in the North end of Timiskaming district. The Timiskaming Health Unit hosted the event which was attended by community members of various ages, recreation staff, the local project manager for the Healthy Kids Community Challenge, local First Nations representatives, health unit staff, and even the mayor. Lisa Tolentino from HC Link facilitated the event using a technique called Open Space, which promotes open sharing and solution-based problem solving.


We started off the day getting to know who was there and then looked at some recent health data from the community (and surrounding area). Looking at where the community is and what they have was a great jumping off point to the discussion on where they want to go. A graphic tool used to facilitate the activity was a mural where attendees listed the assets that the community currently has (e.g. infrastructure, services, etc.), and the ones they would like to have. This ensured that everyone was on the same page for the day.

parcblog1

 

The group began by identifying the topics of greatest interest in the community related to physical activity and then broke into small groups to discuss barriers to physical activity opportunities, engaging the community (including those who aren’t currently active), and promoting what’s already available in Kirkland Lake. Each group discussed their topic, how to measure it, what the causes are, what options are available to address it and who the potential partners could be. After this information was gathered, a high level action plan was created to determine what can be done within the next 3-6 months to move forward on the solution(s).

parcblog2

Often in this field, we are encouraged to engage a variety of partners and this event was a testament to the value of doing so. Relationships were developed for future partnerships and outside of the box solutions were brainstormed by community members. For example, discussions around awareness of what is currently available sparked the idea of having a community notice board for anything from physical activity events and outings to garage sales. Having such a wide range of community members partake in the day was both motivating and enriching.


PARC was pleased to have the chance to lead this energetic and committed group in a couple of physical activity breaks to help boost creativity, and of course add a little more fun to the day!

parcblog3

Thank you for the opportunity to be a part of this day of solution focused sharing!

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e.brown.lisa@gmail.com (Lisa Brown) Uncategorized Thu, 03 Dec 2015 16:08:57 -0500
David Courtemanche - Breathing Life into Policy Change http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/david-courtemanche-breathing-life-into-policy-change.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/david-courtemanche-breathing-life-into-policy-change.html Keynote Address

On Day Two of our conference we will begin with a Keynote address from David Courtemanche, a consultant with many years of experience in public service and policy development. His keynote address – Breathing Life into Policy Change will energize the policy advocacy experience by exploring the political dynamics, decision-makers, leverage points and strategies for being an effective health advocate. He will discuss how to shift the health culture of your community totransform the social, economic and environmental landscape and affect sustainable change.

 

david courtemancheCourtemanche in Politics  

  • David Courtemanche served in public office for almost a decade and, in 2003 at 39 years old, became the youngest elected Mayor in the history of Sudbury.  
  • He was elected to City Council in 1997 and again in 2000.  
  • As Mayor, he served on provincial and national bodies including the Board of Health, the Economic Development Board, the Regional Planning Board, the Canadian Big City Mayors' Task Force on Immigration, and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.  
  • Courtemanche has led multiple community initiatives such as the: Healthy Communities Strategy, Community Leadership Cabinet, Community Action Network, and theTask Force on Volunteerism & Citizen Involvement.

Management Consulting  

  • Courtemanche is the Founder of Leading Minds Inc., a management consultant firm specializing in leadership development for individuals, organizations and communities.
  • He has held senior management positions at several organizations and is currently the Executive Director of the City of Lakes Family Health Team.  

 

Work in Building Healthy Communities

Interested in hearing David Courtemanche speak about policy change? There is still time to register for Linking for Healthy Communities: Action for Change. Visit the conference page for more information on registration, programming and presenters.

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e.brown.lisa@gmail.com (Lisa Brown) Uncategorized Mon, 26 Oct 2015 16:20:35 -0400
Racism and Health Series - Indigenous Health http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/indigenous-health.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/indigenous-health.html

By Mica Pereira Bajard

When I moved to Canada from Bolivia—where the majority of the population is indigenous, and where racism is not a taboo topic—as a child, I would not have imagined that indigeneity and racism would become central topics of discussion and reflections in my Canadian professional and personal lives. At age 11, I never imagined the horrendous effects that colonialism had (and continues to have) on the lives of Indigenous peoples in this country. Canada, with its universal health care and polite population, seemed like the gold standard of ‘great’ countries.

Today, I understand that the health of Indigenous peoples in Canada (and abroad) is inextricably linked to the respect of human rights. First Nations (status and non-status), Métis and Inuit populations—the First Peoples of this country— make up less than five percent of the population in the land we call Canada, yet the country seems to be uninterested in protecting and promoting their health and their rights (Canada is one of four countries worldwide not to have adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples). Canada’s governments have been stubborn bullies toward the people on whose lands Canada was ‘created.’

The flagrant health inequities that exist between indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada today are a manifestation of the effect that social and political factors can have on the health of populations.  Exploring the impact that Canadian policies have on these populations using a social determinants of health framework brings to light the implicit racism and colonialism embedded in the status quo of our country’s functioning. For example, rather than fostering indigenous self-determination, the federal government imposes its policies on which indigenous groups have access to health care through the Non-Insured Health Benefit program (only status First Nations and Inuit). The government’s refusal to launch a national inquiry on the missing and murdered indigenous women, despite indigenous women being five times more likely to be murdered than non-indigenous women, is another example of institutional racism that hinders the health of Indigenous peoples. I argue that if the missing and murdered aboriginal women were white women, the government would have a different reaction. A third and important example is the continuous institutionalization of indigenous children.  In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized on behalf of Canadians for the residential school system—which attempted to assimilate indigenous children by removing them from their households— and recognized that this system continues to have profound social effects on survivors and their communities. Nevertheless, it is absolutely necessary to note that there are currently more children under state care today than at the peak of residential schools. Children are being removed from their homes, separated from their parents. How, and why, is Canada apologizing for something it is still committing? 

The above examples are only the tip of an iceberg of the impact that colonial, racist policies has on the lives of Indigenous peoples. Racism against Indigenous peoples underpins most, if not all, policies in Canada, resulting in poor health outcomes for First Nations, Métis and Inuit groups.  This is so much so that scholars Mikkonen and Raphael identified Aboriginal Status as one important social determinant of health in Canada. Compared to non-indigenous Canadians, Indigenous peoples have higher rates of infectious and chronic illnesses are more likely to live in crowded housing and have higher rates of food insecurity, among many other health outcomes. All of these outcomes are the result of racist, colonial tendencies in Canada’s way of governing. That the Public Health Agency of Canada does not recognize Aboriginal Status as a determinant of health is an example of institutional efforts to avoid explicitly acknowledging that we have a race problem.

The continuous dismissal and exclusion of indigenous knowledge and practices in policy and decision-making in Canada contributes to the systemic racism that harms the health of Canada’s first peoples. It is time to shift the governing power to the people whose lands we are on in order to best protect and promote their rights and health. The Canadian government’s lack of recognition that it is racist in its way of functioning is perhaps the greatest threat to the well-being of Indigenous peoples.

Despite all the challenges and issues that remain to be mitigated, there are important stakeholders and initiatives that are working towards creating a more just, inclusive, and respectful Canada. In particular, the 2015 First Peoples, Second Class Treatment Discussion Paper by Dr. Allan and Dr. Smylie offers avenues to change by recommending that the Canadian government embrace honest, transparent conversations about the implicit racism in policies across sectors (ranging from access to health care to education). They argue that better, more meaningful, data should be collected on the health status of Indigenous peoples in Canada to better explore the effects of racism, and that we invest in effective, anti-racist interventions to improve indigenous health. Additionally, the 2015 Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action, which seeks to redress the legacy of residential schools and work towards reconciliation, asks that all levels of government: be transparent in their child welfare policies specific to Indigenous peoples; revise educational curriculums with Indigenous peoples; protect indigenous cultures and languages; improve health care for Indigenous peoples; and work towards the reversal of the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in prisons among other efforts for reconciliation. These calls to action also demand for more professional opportunities for Indigenous peoples in all sectors. Lastly, advocates such as Michèle Audette, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, who engage with decision-makers and community members are making progress towards the recognition of racism in Canada.

Join us on October 23rd and 24th, 2015 at the Racial Justice Matters conference to dig deeper in discussion about the importance of indigenous health and rights, the necessity to change the status quo to ensure indigenous world views, rather than racism, are embedded in policy decision-making, and the role that solidarity and ally-ship can play in creating a better, more indigenous-centred Canada.

Micaela Pereira Bajard is a Master of Public Health Candidate at the University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health (DLSPH). Follow her on Twitter at @MicaPB or on her personal blog “Mica est là”.

 

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e.brown.lisa@gmail.com (Lisa Brown) Uncategorized Fri, 16 Oct 2015 09:11:07 -0400
Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/position-statement-on-active-outdoor-play.html http://hclinkontario.ca/blog/entry/position-statement-on-active-outdoor-play.html Last winter, in the midst of a particularly frigid deep freeze, I had the opportunity to comment on a draft Position Statement circulated by Shawna Babcock of KidActive on the role and risks of "Active Outdoor Play. I was so excited about what I was reading. I had visions of printing it off, and running it down to our local Board of Education office, waving it in front of any administrator who would listen.

While I'm normally not that impassioned by policy statements, I was this time. For the last several weeks, in the grips of an unrelenting cold winter, the students at our local school were prohibited from playing on the "back field" at break, due to the risk of slipping on the ice. Three times that week, I drove past our school when kids were on their recess. I had expected to see a flurry of winter wonderland activity: snowfort building, sliding on snowpants, broomball maybe. Instead I saw hundreds of bundled up students, standing around like unhappy penguins trying to keep warm.

When I inquired as to why they weren't allowed to play in the playground in the snow, I learned of a board-wide policy intended to protect students from slipping on the ice and hurting themselves. My immediate thought (which I didn't actually say) was "Gee - that's ironic. I spend good money every year making sure my kid does slip on the ice . It's called hockey, and yes I know it's different because he wears a helmet. " The point was made. I got the intent, but that old school Mom in me was screaming "Are you kidding?? Let's just thrown them their iPods and a pack of smokes and hope for the best." There had to be a better way.

I suggested parents could sign a waiver, I attempted to sign my child out at break and allow them to go a nearby park to build forts or play hockey. None of my workarounds were going to work - from the school's perspective. But now, here in my hot little hand, were cold, hard facts, also known evidence and research, to back up my position.

Snippets of facts with footnotes to support them:

  • "Canadian children are eight times more likely to die as a passenger in a motor vehicle than from being hit by a vehicle when outside on foot or on a bike."

  • " When children spend more time in front of screens they are more likely to be exposed to cyber-predators and violence, and eat unhealthy snacks."

The Position Statement

The position statement gave recommendations to set us on a different path (an evidence-informed track by the way) that would result in happier, fitter (and warmer) students.

Here's what the experts had to say:

Educators and Caregivers: Regularly embrace the outdoors for learning, socialization and physical activity opportunities, in various weather conditions—including rain and snow. Risky active play is an important part of childhood and should not be eliminated from the school yard or childcare centre.

Schools and Municipalities: Examine existing policies and by-laws and reconsider those that pose a barrier to a ctive outdoor play.

Provincial and Municipal Governments: Work together to create an environment where Public Entities are protected from frivolous lawsuits over minor injuries related to normal and healthy outdoor risky active play.

The report ends with this great question: In an era of schoolyard ball bans and debates about safe tobogganing, have we as a society lost the appropriate balance between keeping children healthy and active and protecting them from serious harm? If we make too many rules about what they can and can’t do, will we hinder their natural ability to develop and learn? If we make injury prevention the ultimate goal of outdoor play spaces, will they be any fun? Are children safer sitting on the couch instead of playing actively outside?

The full report is available in both English and French at: http://www.haloresearch.ca/outdoorplay/

Workshop on active play at our upcoming conference!

Active Outdoor Play Position Statement: Nature, risk & children's well-being

Presenters: Shawna Babcock, KidActive @KidActiveCanada 

Marlene Power, Child and Nature Alliance of Canada @cnalliance

Join us to learn about the history, evidence and expertise that contributed to the development of the Active Outdoor Play Position Statement. We will share insights, stories, tools and evidence-based approaches to support the connection between healthy child development and nature, risk and active outdoor play.

 

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khodgson@opha.on.ca (Kim Hodgson) Uncategorized Tue, 29 Sep 2015 16:21:38 -0400