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Welcome to HC Link's blog! Our blog will provide you with useful information on healthy community topics, news, and resources, as well as information on HC Link’s events, activities, and resources. Our bloggers include HC Link staff and consultants, as well as our partnering organizations, clients, and experts in the health promotion field.

Please note: opinions in posts are those of the author and are not necessarily the opinions of HC Link or our funder.

We look forward to engaging in thought-provoking conversation with you!

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Webinar Recap: How to Engage Francophones- when you don’t speak French!

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

A few years ago, prior to the creation of HC Link, I had the opportunity to work with a group of health promotion resource centres whose intent was to provide services in French. At that time, though I had grown up in Quebec and even attended French Immersion school, I wasn’t able to speak much French. That led to a pretty commonly held belief: if you can’t speak French, you can’t work with Francophones and you can’t work towards offering services in French.

Fortunately for me, I was with a group of very passionate health promoters- Anglophones and Francophones- who helped me to see that non-French speakers have a critical role to play when it comes to engaging Francophone communities and planning French language services. It was that group of people that inspired me to try to regain the French skills I had as a child. Thanks to a number of courses, terrific tutors and a lot of perseverance, I am making progress. I have also experienced the sheer frustration of knowing what I want to say, but not having the words to express myself. I can easily imagine what it is like for people who are sick, need medical attention, or are trying to improve their health or life circumstance and can’t receive services in their own language.

There are of course a wide variety of languages spoken in Ontario. French is unique in that there is political and legislative recognition of the rights of Franco-Ontarians to receive services in French. These are the factors which led me, along with former HC Link staff Estelle Duchon, to create the webinar and accompanying resource: How to Engage Francophones- when you don’t speak French! My HC Link colleague Patrick Delorme and I have recently updated the original resource, and today we offered a webinar on the topic.

In the webinar and resource, we identify three important steps to take when engaging Francophone communities in your region (whether you speak French or not):

  1. Clearly define your motives and purpose for engaging Francophones;

  2. Understand the context and history of  Francophone in your region, in Ontario and in Canada

  3. Partner with organizations and networks in your region who work with Francophones

We also talked about common pitfalls and challenges in engaging Francophones, and what strategies you can use to avoid them. One excellent question from our webinar participants:

Q: How do we ensure that, when we are translating resources into French, we don’t lose the context?

A:Translation is a tricky (and also time consuming and resource intensive) process. We recommend several steps to ensure that the translated materials are high quality, useful and relevant for the Francophone community:

  • At the risk of listing something quite obvious, use a professional translator and avoid Google Translator at all costs!

  • Put together a “lexicon” of words and their translations related to the resource/program. Add to the lexicon over time and provide it to your translators.

  • Ask Francophone colleagues, partners and/or community members to review the translated document. Try to find Francophones from your region and from your sector who are familiar with the local/contextual vernacular.

  • For a longer resource, manual or a program that you are translating in French, we recommend adapting it for your Francophone audience. If possible, establish an advisory committee (again, Francophone colleagues, partners and/or community members from your region and from your sector) and work with them to identify the components of the resource/materials that need to be adapted to fit the needs and realities of the Francophones you are trying to reach. Once the materials are translated and adapted, pilot test them with the target audience and ask for feedback on them.  

 

You can watch a recording of the webinar or view the webinar slides on our website.

 

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OHCC and Developmental Evaluation

Lorna McCue, Executive Director, Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition (OHCC)

The Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition, a member organization of HC Link, recently sent three OHCC Board members and the Executive Director to a workshop on Developmental Evaluation (DE), provided by Innoweave, to learn more about this approach and its suitability for their Healthy Food Program.

This workshop was facilitated by Jamie Gamble of Imprint Consulting, who has designed and delivered consulting projects in evaluation, strategy, and organizational change over the past decade. He has written a Developmental Evaluation Primer for this series of workshops.

The workshop was designed for teams of 3-4 leaders of an organization to learn together about developmental evaluation and work together to develop a plan to undertake a developmental evaluation for a specific program.

Prior to attending the workshop, participants were invited to view a pre-recorded webinar online, and were given a link to view or download the slides.

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Developmental Evaluation is an evaluation approach that supports innovation by providing close to real time feedback on activities, which facilitates continuous development. It is particularly useful in guiding adaptation within complex environments, and is a useful approach to evaluating Collective Impact initiatives. The evaluation methods and tools aren’t necessarily different than those used in a more traditional evaluation, but how they are used is quite different. The evaluation activities are undertaken in a more flexible, team-oriented, user-friendly way, and are geared to on-going learning and development. Data is collected more frequently, the process of interpretation and generating recommendations is timely, new issues are explored as they are identified, and the program design and the evaluation measure may be altered during the evaluation time frame.

The OHCC team decided to plan for a DE of its Healthy Food program. Since 2003 OHCC has worked with partners to support the development of sustainable local food systems and increase community food security within Ontario communities. Recent planning sessions have led to the alignment of OHCC’s food-related resources and activities under one Healthy Food program. The goal of this program is to engage communities in assessing and developing their local food system and build capacity for local solutions to hunger, including emergency services, capacity building programs, access to land and facilities for gardening and food re-distribution and system change initiatives. Our current work in this area includes providing consultation and learning activities through HC Link, to build the capacity of community food programs, and supporting FoodNet Ontario, a provincial network of individuals and organizations working towards sustainable local food systems and community food security.

During this workshop, the OHCC team focussed on exploring the scope of the evaluation process, the risks entailed in undertaking a DE instead of a more traditional evaluation approach and the evaluation methods that would be appropriate for this program. All team members agreed that DE was a good fit for this program, but that further work was needed in program design before a DE could be undertaken. They also expressed their appreciation for the training they received in DE and may have opportunities to apply the concepts to other programs in which they are involved.

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Webinar Recap - Highlights from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey

By Heather Lillico, Provincial System Support Program, CAMH

CAMH's Provincial System Support Program (PSSP) and EENet co-hosted part one of a two-part webinar series on Wednesday, June 22nd sharing findings from the 2015 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS). The OSDUHS always impresses me because it's the longest running school based survey in Canada! It began in 1977, at a time when bell bottom jeans and tie dye ruled the world.

The webinar kicked off with PSSP's very own Tamar Meyer and Jason Guriel sharing some highlights from the 2015 OSDUHS Drug Use Results Report. Then CAMH expert panelists Dr. Robert Mann, Dr. Hayley Hamilton, Gloria Chaim, and Angela Boak took turns discussing what stood out for them with the results, and how the information could be used to inform policy and programming. Here are some things that stood out for me from the webinar:

  • Students reported use of prescription opioids for nonmedical use, over the counter cough/cold meds, and energy drinks declined since 2013 (great!).
  • Ecstasy increased since 2013 (up 2.1%).
  • The age of initiation for drinking alcohol, smoking cigarettes, and using cannabis has increased over time (ie. students are starting later).
  • Abstinence from drug use including alcohol and tobacco is currently higher than about a decade ago.
  • Although tobacco smoking rates have declined, about 1 in 10 students still report smoking...that's still a big number!
  • Despite a long-term decline, binge drinking remains at an elevated level, as about one-in-six students (an estimated 168,100) report drinking five or more drinks on the same occasion once in the past month.

Have a listen to the webinar and look at the slides for more information.

OSDUHS also has a fantastic interactive website with highlights from the 2015 report which I recommend checking out. PSSP also includes the CAMH Health Promotion Resource Centre and the Opioid Resource Hub which help support the work of EENet, check them out as well for more resources!

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Part two of this webinar series will delve deeper into how to put all this fantastic research into action. Stay tuned for information on a date!

 

 

 

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Public Health Ethics Part 3 of 3: Applying Public Health Ethics at Your Work

By Stephanie Massot, Public Health Practicum Student at Health Nexus

This is the third blog post in a series on public health ethics. This post focuses on how to apply public health ethics to your work.

I am starting to feel as though public health ethics is like a good sandwich you have made yourself. If you have been following my last two blog posts in this series, you will be more familiar with your philosophical orientation and differentiating between bioethics, public health ethics, and health promotion ethics. These make up the main protein and key ingredients to a good public health ethics sandwich. If you have made a sandwich before, you are going to know what your favourite ingredients are – mine is always cheese and Dijon mustard! If it is your first time making a sandwich or you have been given new ingredients, there will be a new process and new discoveries. Guidance on making a sandwich is important. You need to know how to bring your ingredients together.

In public health ethics, frameworks have been developed to provide assistance to practitioners who are deliberating an ethical issue in different contexts. Strengths of frameworks include making values explicit and thinking through potential unintended consequences of proposed interventions, from policies to programs. The National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP) has an extensive list of ethics frameworks for public health. Going back to the sandwich analogy, what you use to ‘frame’ your ingredients, from a challah bun to rye bread, will change your eating experience. For instance, Nancy Kass provides a list of questions in her framework (great summary from NCCHPP) and Andrew Tannahill focuses on a list of principles or ‘principlism’ to guide his framework.

Principlism is a ‘broad approach of identifying a set of principles to be considered and specified when facing a decision that may contain ethical issues1 and a practical tool for practitioners who are not familiar with public health ethics. Principles can be separated into substantive and procedural categories:

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I was recently reading Unison Health and Community Services’ workbook (jam-packed with tasty ingredients) for community based evidence-informed practice. What I noticed was that an ethical framework(s) was not provided, even for the evaluative learning tools. Referring to another tool such as the Community Ethics Toolkit, could support you to consider and dialogue about public health ethics.

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Just like you might not enjoy the idea of combining certain ingredients on your sandwich (pickles and peanut butter anyone?), there will be conflicts between principles that will require deliberation. Frameworks for public health ethics will need refinement, perhaps they will even need to be combined, for your context – only through practice will you find out how to best apply them. For an excellent case study check out: ‘Getting Through Together: Ethical Values for a Pandemic’. The Ministry of Health in New Zealand worked closely with Māori communities because ‘shared values give us a shared basis for decisions.’ Now how about that sandwich?

 

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1 MacDonald, M. (2015). Introduction to Public Health Ethics 3: Frameworks for Public Health Ethics. National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy. Montréal, Québec.

 

 

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HC Link Blog Series on Facilitation Techniques: Wrap Up

By Kyley Alderson, HC Link

Good facilitation is an essential component to achieving success as a group. A facilitator helps a group to accomplish its objectives by ensuring comfort, fairness and good participation from all members, maximizing a group’s ability to come up with ideas/solutions, and keeping a group on track to move towards its goals.

At HC Link, we take pride in our staff and our ability to help groups achieve success through our facilitation skills. We have received a number of requests asking for more information on various facilitation approaches and techniques – so we decided to do a blog series to assist in your learning!


Here is a listing of all of the blogs in this series:

Introduction to Choosing a Facilitation Technique

Peer Sharing: the wise crowds technique

Breaking the Ice: putting a little fun into working with groups

Appreciative Inquiry

Facilitating a Priority Setting Exercise

1-2-4-all: Engage everyone in group conversation

Using “Visioning” as a Facilitation Technique

Using popular theatre as a facilitation technique


We hope you found this information and examples helpful!

Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have – or to request a service from us to help with facilitating your community processes, meetings or events.

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