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Andrea has been with HC Link since its inception in 2009 and is currently HC Link Coordinator located at Health Nexus. Andrea has an extensive background in physical activity and health promotion and has worked in local recreation centres and public health units as well as provincial NGOs and agencies. Andrea is a student of French and is passionate about working with Anglophones to build their capacity to engage Francophones
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Why I’m SO EXCITED about Vision Zero

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

This post is part of a blog series leading up to Canada’s Vision Zero Summit on November 29, 2016. Learn more about Sweden’s Vision Zero approach and Parachute’s Canadian approach. 

On November 29th, my colleague Robyn Kalda and I will be attending Canada’s Vision Zero Summit in Toronto as part of the Social Media Team. We’ll be live tweeting and blogging away and sharing the learnings from this national conference. As health promoters, it makes sense that we’d believe that our roads should be safe for all road users: pedestrians, cyclists and car drivers/occupants. As proponents of healthy communities we believe in the many benefits that occur when people can walk, bike, roll and dance through their communities. So of course we love Vision Zero’s philosophy: that no one should be killed or seriously injured within the road transport system.

On a personal level though, I’m excited about Vision Zero because I want to live.

Yes, it may sound dramatic. And also, hopeful……because I am a vulnerable road user. I live in Toronto, where I am a full-time cycle commuter (10 months of the year) and daily pedestrian. The reality is, in the city that I live in, that the number of pedestrian and cyclist deaths is just shy of the homicide rate. In the first 6 months of 2016, there were more than 1,000 cyclists and pedestrians hit on Toronto streets. I once met a Toronto cyclist that referred to her daily commute as “my daily meditation on death”. I do have at least one “OMG” moment every commute, and what I’d call a close call once or twice a week. Even as a pedestrian, I’m scared. One of the most dangerous parts of my regular walk to various errands is a pedestrian crossing- you know, the one with the flashing lights where, by law, car drivers and cyclists are supposed to stop and stay stopped until I’ve reached the sidewalk on the other side? I’m nearly struck by a car driver at least half of the occasions that I use that crossing.

cycling

My sister and me (left) cycling on the Bloor Viaduct during Open Streets Toronto.

Given all of that, why do I risk my life every day just to move around the city? Well, I’ll bet you can guess some of the reasons. Cycling to work is more convenient and less costly that taking public transit. I get 40 minutes of physical activity every day just by going to work! I arrive at work flushed, with my blood pumping and brain working. It makes me smile to speed past the cars in traffic and whiz down hills. I recently purchased aBike Share membership and I giggle every time I’m on one of those bikes, they are so big and stable and Mary Poppins like. It’s amazing what cyclists will put up with just to get that daily dose of biking awesomeness. Once you try it, you will never go back.

That is also one of the challenges- getting people to try it. And one of the ways to get people to try cycling is to make it as safe and convenient as possible. That’s where Vision Zero comes in. One of the things that I love about Vision Zero is that it is a comprehensive approach that addresses:

  • Reducing impaired driving
  • Implementing safer speed limits
  • Increasing the use of seatbelts
  • Introducing safer car design
  • Improving road infrastructure
  • Enhancing pedestrian and cyclist safety

In a Vision Zero community, there is advocacy for policy change, enhanced regulation, road infrastructure changes and information is provided about dangers of risk factors. The Vision Zero philosophy is one of shared responsibility between those that design the roads and those that use the roads.  The emphasis is on designing streets that result in the behaviour that you want to see, rather than simply trying to legislated and enforce behaviour change. By remembering that all road users are humans- and therefore make mistakes- we can engineer around mistakes and therefore avoid them.

visionzero

Screen capture from http://www.visionzeroinitiative.com/

Vision Zero in Canada

Vision Zero began in Sweden, where it’s had astonishing success. Vision Zero is starting to make inroads in North America, including several Canadian cities:

In Toronto, the city’s Road Safety Plan includes the Vision Zero vision to reduce the number of road fatalities and serious injuries to zero, with an initial target of reducing fatalities by 20% by 2026. I hope that next week’s Vision Zero Summit will help to shift this target!

HC Link’s blog series on Vision Zero

Vision Zero: No more road deaths

Why I’m SO Excited about Vision Zero

Vision Zero’s approach to infrastructure: Making mobility safe from the start

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Water Does Wonders in Humber-Downsview

HC Link is proud to be a part of the Healthy Kids Community Challenge (HKCC) by supporting the 45 participating communities across Ontario. The current theme that HKCC communities are supporting right now is “Water Does Wonders”, which emphasizes choosing water over sugar sweetened beverages. Many of the communities are involved in activities that promote water consumption, such as providing refillable water bottles, community swims, and refill stations. In this post, Myriam Castilla, Local Project Manager for Toronto-Humber-Downsview, shares how they are incorporating Water Does Wonders into their local work.

I am eager to share with all of you one of the exciting Water does Wonders activities that is happening here in the Humber-Downsview community.

Annually, from the first week of July to the third week of August, the Youth Association for Academics Athletics and Character Education (YAAACE), runs a Summer Institute camp for 400 children from the Humber-Downsview community. Most of these children belong to the City of Toronto Neighborhood Investment Areas where a large amount of the population experiences high levels of inequity and poor health.

This year, in partnership with HKCC, YAAACE decided to adopt HKCC’s theme "Water does Wonders" as a main subject for their Summer Institute. The curriculum for this camp was developed to promote Water does Wonders message; 25 teachers were trained on HKCC’s objectives, principles, and strategies to promote water intake; and 50 youth staff were trained on water facts and strategies to promote healthy drink choices among children.

In addition, YAAACE adopted a Healthy Eating policy; which includes having servings of fruits and vegetables in their lunches and snacks, and that only tap water is available during camp’s activities. To re-enforce this message, all sugary drinks were removed from vending machines in their premises.

What is unique about YAAACE’s initiatives is that this community organization uses an innovative social inclusion model to support children and youth from low income communities to grow, learn and play in an environment that is responsive and supportive of their needs, interests, expectations, and aspirations. It offers access to programs that integrate academic, athletic, social and artistic activities through school, after school programs, weekend programs, and camps. 

YAAACE’s academic activities target students who fall below the provincial standards in literacy and in numeracy due to multiple factors, including exposure to violence or trauma. To ensure child success, with the support of mentors, YAAACE’s programs coordinate with children’s schools and caregivers.

We are thrilled because of the impact of the Summer Institute in this community; the key messages of Water does Wonders has been widely disseminated, and 400 children are receiving the messages in a culturally relevant form, and clearly changing their behavior towards enjoying drinking tap water and eating more fruits and vegetables.

WDW 1

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Webinar Recap: How to Engage Francophones- when you don’t speak French!

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

A few years ago, prior to the creation of HC Link, I had the opportunity to work with a group of health promotion resource centres whose intent was to provide services in French. At that time, though I had grown up in Quebec and even attended French Immersion school, I wasn’t able to speak much French. That led to a pretty commonly held belief: if you can’t speak French, you can’t work with Francophones and you can’t work towards offering services in French.

Fortunately for me, I was with a group of very passionate health promoters- Anglophones and Francophones- who helped me to see that non-French speakers have a critical role to play when it comes to engaging Francophone communities and planning French language services. It was that group of people that inspired me to try to regain the French skills I had as a child. Thanks to a number of courses, terrific tutors and a lot of perseverance, I am making progress. I have also experienced the sheer frustration of knowing what I want to say, but not having the words to express myself. I can easily imagine what it is like for people who are sick, need medical attention, or are trying to improve their health or life circumstance and can’t receive services in their own language.

There are of course a wide variety of languages spoken in Ontario. French is unique in that there is political and legislative recognition of the rights of Franco-Ontarians to receive services in French. These are the factors which led me, along with former HC Link staff Estelle Duchon, to create the webinar and accompanying resource: How to Engage Francophones- when you don’t speak French! My HC Link colleague Patrick Delorme and I have recently updated the original resource, and today we offered a webinar on the topic.

In the webinar and resource, we identify three important steps to take when engaging Francophone communities in your region (whether you speak French or not):

  1. Clearly define your motives and purpose for engaging Francophones;

  2. Understand the context and history of  Francophone in your region, in Ontario and in Canada

  3. Partner with organizations and networks in your region who work with Francophones

We also talked about common pitfalls and challenges in engaging Francophones, and what strategies you can use to avoid them. One excellent question from our webinar participants:

Q: How do we ensure that, when we are translating resources into French, we don’t lose the context?

A:Translation is a tricky (and also time consuming and resource intensive) process. We recommend several steps to ensure that the translated materials are high quality, useful and relevant for the Francophone community:

  • At the risk of listing something quite obvious, use a professional translator and avoid Google Translator at all costs!

  • Put together a “lexicon” of words and their translations related to the resource/program. Add to the lexicon over time and provide it to your translators.

  • Ask Francophone colleagues, partners and/or community members to review the translated document. Try to find Francophones from your region and from your sector who are familiar with the local/contextual vernacular.

  • For a longer resource, manual or a program that you are translating in French, we recommend adapting it for your Francophone audience. If possible, establish an advisory committee (again, Francophone colleagues, partners and/or community members from your region and from your sector) and work with them to identify the components of the resource/materials that need to be adapted to fit the needs and realities of the Francophones you are trying to reach. Once the materials are translated and adapted, pilot test them with the target audience and ask for feedback on them.  

 

You can watch a recording of the webinar or view the webinar slides on our website.

 

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Paving the Way: A peer sharing session on defining the policy problem

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

This blog post is part of a series on the topic of developing health public policy written by HC Link staff and our partner organizations. If you would like to contribute to this series, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Today I hosted a peer sharing session, along with Kim Bergeron from Health Promotion Capacity Building at Public Health Ontario. Called “Paving the Way”, today’s peer sharing session built on last month’s online discussion (of the same name) on defining the policy problem. Using a teleconference line and webinar platform, we had an interesting discussion about some of the approaches to and challenges with defining the policy problem. Our discussion focused around four main themes:

Language

Developing a shared and common language is important, particularly when working with a variety of stakeholders on policy development. One of our participants is working with community members, the police, landlords and service provides to develop a policy. I can imagine that such a diverse group would not only use different language, but might even use the same words to mean different things. Kim suggested drafting a glossary to create and define common terms to use throughout the policy development process. Developing a common agenda, part of the collective impact process, has useful tips for this step.

Evidence

A participant shared their experience of using evidence in the problem definition stage, by collecting data such as literature reviews, rapid reviews, community assessments etc and analyzing these data sources to identify the nature of the problem and identify potential policy solutions. This gave rise to an excellent question from another participant: Do you collect all of the evidence and then consult with stakeholders and the community, or do consult with stakeholders and the community and then collect the evidence that you need to support it?

I suggested trying to find the “sweet spot” between collecting evidence and working with the community. At HC Link, our definition of evidence includes not only published literature and population health data, it also includes lived experience and cultural knowledge. We view the experiences and input of the community and stakeholders as one source of evidence, rather than separate from it.

Another participant who does international development work in the area of maternal and child health shared that their organization does data collection and community engagement concurrently through two different departments.

Timing

Developing health public policy is one of those health promotion strategies where time seems to operate differently from the rest of our work! By that I mean the sheer length of time that it can take to develop, implement and evaluate a policy (often having to go back and repeat a step, or jump ahead when there is sudden media support around the issue, and go back again). Kim reminded us that we may have to work with the election cycle, and sometimes at different levels of government (each running on their own election cycle). And of course, carving out the time to work with partners and do policy work!

Knowledge Exchange Strategy

Kim’s takeaway from today’s peer sharing session was on the important of developing a knowledge exchange (KE) strategy that runs the entire length of the policy development process: planning, implementation and evaluation. We often stop to develop a KE strategy at certain points of the policy development process, when actually KE should be continued at each and every stage, in particular when the community and stakeholders are involved.

Resources mentioned during today’s peer sharing session

FOCUS ON: Relevance of the stages heuristic model for developing health public policies http://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/eRepository/Focus_On_Stages_Model_and_Policies.pdf

Are We Ready to Address Policy? Assessing and building readiness for policy work http://www.hclinkontario.ca/images/Are_We_Ready_To_Address_Policy.pdf

Tools from Healthy Living Niagara to track municipal decisions

http://healthylivingniagara.com/active-transportation/understanding-municipal-decision-makers/

Recent comment in this post
Kim Bergeron
Great summary of the discussion Andrea. It was helpful to have a focused conversation on defining the policy problem. Often there ... Read More
Friday, 22 April 2016 12:50
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Paving the Way: an online discussion on defining the policy problem

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

This blog post is part of a series on the topic of developing health public policy written by HC Link and our partner organizations. If you would like to contribute to this series, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


This afternoon, Kim Bergeron (Health Promotion Consultant with Health Promotion Capacity Building Services at Public Health Ontario) and I were joined by 22 people to talk policy. Kim and I normally get pretty excited about the topic of policy, and we enjoyed having others to share our enthusiasm with. The purpose of the online discussion was to explore three concepts in defining the policy problem that we will be diving into more deeply over the course of the year.


The topic of the online discussion was on defining the policy problem. This is a tricky step in policy development, where often times we jump to policy solutions (or are given policy solutions by our agency/funder) rather than taking the time to explore the nature of the problem that the policy is intended to solve. It’s important to take the time to define the nature of the problem so that a) you can articulate it b) you can get the support that you need from community and stakeholders and c) you can select the policy option that best solves the problem.


Kim began by introducing the concept of determining the type of problem we have on our hands:

  1. Tame problems: are those where stakeholders agree on the nature of the problem and on the best way to solve it;

  2. Complex problems: are those where stakeholders agree on the nature of the problem, but not on how to best solve it; and

  3. Wicked problems: stakeholders agree neither on the nature of the problem, nor on its solution. They are not evil, but are those problems that are considered highly resistant to resolve. The first action to define the problem is to recognize what type of problem it is.


We then had a conversation about wicked problems, using the example of safe injection sites. We discussed that values, personal bias, political opinion and ideology often affect how people see the problem and solutions. The public and various stakeholders often disagree about the precise nature of the problem, and whether it is a downstream, mid-stream or upstream one. We discussed the importance of developing a shared understanding amongst your stakeholders, engaging them in the conversation, on the nature of the problem and the possible policy solutions to it. We identified techniques and shared resources on how to develop that shared understanding, including:

  • Dialogue mapping

  • Collective Impact: a recent blog post from Tamarack discusses the tensions in light of a “wicked problem” in Collective Impact

  • Deliberative dialogue: the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy has a collection of resources on Deliberative Processes

  • Finding areas of agreement and building relationships from there

  • Policy narratives: an article by Steven Ney and Marco Verweij discusses “Messy Institutions for Wicked Problems: how to Generate Clumsy Solutions”


Once you have identified the type of problem to be addressed and have developed a shared, collective understanding of the problem, there is a need to identify ways to communicate this information to others to build support and/or increase awareness. We discussed communication vehicles that we have used to communicate a shared understanding of a problem:


Kim and I are looking forward to diving into this subject more deeply at our peer sharing session on April 21. During this session, we’ll hear from 3 or 4 people about their experiences in defining the policy problem, and we’ll have the opportunity to talk more about our experiences, challenges and solutions. Registration for the peer sharing session is limited to 20 people to ensure that we can have a deep conversation. Register soon!

 

 

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1-2-4-all: Engage everyone in group conversation

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

This is the sixth blog post in a series on facilitation techniques and approaches written by HC Link staff. This post focuses on a particular Liberating Structure technique called 1-2-4-all.


1-2-4-all is one of my favourite Liberating Structures. It’s a great technique to ensure that everyone is able to participate and have their ideas heard. Used to gather ideas and information from the group, 1-2-4-all can be used for a variety of purposes from priority setting to strategic planning to brainstorming. In this post I’ll describe the technique itself, and how it can be used in a variety of ways.


What is 1-2-4-all?

As I mentioned, the primary purpose of 1-2-4-all is to gather information from a group of people. The exercise begins with a very broad and open ended question so that the information that we gather from participants is not directed in any way. The strength of 1-2-4-all is that everyone is engaged in the conversation (even people who don’t normally participate in group conversation), and then when the groups become larger (4 and all) themes can emerge. Ideas and solutions come from the participants in the conversation, which facilitates buy-in.

This exercise is meant to be done rapidly. As a facilitator, it’s important to explain that so that participants share their ideas briefly and stay focused on the precise question. The exercise unfolds in this way:

  • 1 - The facilitator asks the question to the group. Each person has a couple of minutes to reflect on the question and write down their thoughts on a cue card (2 mins)

  • 2 - Next participants get into pairs and discuss their thoughts (2 mins)

  • 4 - Each pair joins with another pair to talk their ideas (4 mins)

  • All- The large group comes back together to report back on their ideas (8-12 mins)

More detailed instructions on 1-2-4-all can be found on the Liberating Structures website.


How to use 1-2-4-all

1-2-4-all is an extremely flexible technique. It can be used to gather input from the group on which of a series of options they prefer, to brainstorm ideas on next steps for the group, to establish a vision for the group, to identify strategic directions etc. Recently I used this technique in focus groups to determine the types of planning tools that people needed in order to accomplish their work. Most often, I use 1-2-4-all to facilitate strategic planning sessions.

I start with a very broad question, usually something like “What are the possibilities for this group?” I have found that by the end of two to three hours, we have all of the content for a strategic plan that can then be discussed and refined. Usually I’ll give each group of 4 a piece of flipchart paper to document their ideas. I then break the “all” portion down into two sections: the first is for each group to report back on their ideas. Then I give the group a break (mealtime is perfect but a coffee break will do) and I then theme all of the ideas and begin to slot the information into the different component of a strategic plan. For example, individual reflections tend to work out to be vision and mission statements, reflections from pairs tend to be objectives or strategic directions, and when people get into groups of 4 they tend to get more specific and action-oriented. I use sticky notes for this portion (colour coding the different components) so that it’s easy to move things around and it’s easy to understand. After the break, I present the information back to the group to validate it, and then we begin to actually move things around and make decisions about how to proceed.


Defining the question

It’s important to spend time in defining the precise question for the 1-2-4-all exercise. Generally speaking a broad question work best- and you may also need some prompts to illustrate the question for your group. For example, for the exercise I mentioned to identify planning tools, I used the question “What is the ONE thing that you need in order to be able to accomplish your work?” (other than more time and staffing resources). The prompt that I used was “I wish I had something that helped me to do.....” For the strategic planning question “What are the possibilities for this group?” I use prompts such as “what could we accomplish if we worked together?” or “if we could make anything happen, what would it be?”

I’ve found it helpful to write the question on a flip chart or power point to keep it front and center as the groups work on it.


Learn more about it!

The Liberating Structures website contains detailed instructions for 1-2-4-all (as well as a variety of other techniques).

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Breaking The Ice: putting a little fun into working with groups

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

This is the third blog post in a series on facilitation techniques and approaches that will be written by various HC Link staff over the next little while. This particular segment focuses on ways to use icebreakers and active games when working with groups.

Anyone who knows me knows that I love icebreakers and games. I have dozens of them ready to go, ready to whip out at a minutes notice. I’m often asked not only to lead icebreakers at events, but also for help from others who must lead them. While icebreakers can be (and should be!) fun, they are not child’s play. It takes a bit of work to make icebreakers meaningful and well as fun. In this post I’ll talk about a few of the things to keep in mind when planning icebreakers and active games, and I’ll also list out a few of my favourites.

Be clear on the purpose. It’s critically important to think about the reason that you want to include icebreakers or active games into your community processes, meetings or events. Understanding the purpose of including these types of activity will help you to select the appropriate one. While fun is definitely one reason, an icebreaker can actually help to deepen the participant experience, introduce content, and even illustrate concepts. In my experience, I’ve found three basic categories of icebreakers and games. At the end of this post I’ll give some examples for each category:

  1. To get to know the group, or for individuals within the group to get to know each other
  2. Physical activity and fun!
  3. To introduce, demonstrate or apply concepts that will be explored in the meetings

Know the personality and preferences of the group. All groups- like all individuals- have personalities. Some groups are formal and like to get down to business, other groups like to have fun and enjoy experiential learning. It is very, very important to understand the personality and preferences of the group (and the personalities within it) when selecting your activities. For instance, I probably wouldn’t play Musical Chairs with a group of business leaders or executive directors, but there are groups that would enjoy it! To help with selecting the icebreaker, ask yourself:

  • Are you working with an established group, a newly created one, or individual participants who do not know each other? If they know each other, how well? What is the level of trust that exists? Are there any group dynamics that you should be aware of?
  • What is the participants’ previous level of experience with ice breakers and active games? Is this experience likely to be positive for them or will there be any resistance?

Always make it optional. There are icebreaker lovers, haters, and those who will participate without having strong feelings one way or the other. Forcing icebreaker-haters to participate will not convince them to love icebreakers (I know, I’ve tried). Make it very clear that no one has to participate in the activity. If the activity that you’ve selected is a very active one, also give other participation options to the group to allow those with different preferences or levels of activity to participate.

Debrief. In my opinion, this is a critical step and one that’s often missed. Having a debrief makes the difference between a game being fun and being a part of the learning/participatory experience. If the purpose of the activity is to have fun, you don’t have to debrief. If however you are using the activity to further the objective of the overall session, you will need to have a debrief with the full group.

Get to know you games

Group juggling: a fun way to get to know the names of people in your group. If your group already knows each other well, you can use favourite vacation destinations, summertime activities etc. instead of names. TIP: I found that using balloons works really well--easier to manage and less likely to injure people or the environment! Be sure to fully explain the safety features of this game to your group. http://wilderdom.com/games/descriptions/GroupJuggle.html

thats meThat’s Me!/ Have you ever……I often use one of these games if I’m doing a workshop with a large group and I want to get a sense of who people are, what they know, and what they want to get out of the session. Customize your questions according to what you want to find out about your group.

http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/tools/tool031.shtml

http://www.playsport.net/activity/have-you-ever

 

Inner/Outer Circle: Have your participants arrange themselves into two circles, one inside the other, so that participants are facing each other. Take 1 minute to talk with the person who is directly in front of you. Then they take one minute to talk to you. After each person in the pair has shared, the people in the outer circle shift 2 people to the left. You then repeat the exercise with your new partner, and so on. Sample questions/topics to discuss during the one minute interval (choose only one. Use the same question for each interaction). Sample questions:

  • What do you hope to get out of today?
  • What is a challenge that you’re currently experiencing in your work?
  • What do you LOVE about the work that you do?

Repeat about 5-8 times

Walk and Talk: Similar Very similar to Inner/Outer Circle, but rather than being in circles, play music and have people walk (or dance) around the room. When the music stops, participants find a person next to them and talk with that person, using the same types of questions as above.

Musical Chairs: This variation of musical chairs is a way for each individual to introduce themselves to the group. Arrange chairs in the center of the room. Make sure there are fewer chairs than people! Play music and have folks wander around the chairs. When the music stops, participants try to find a chair. Those left standing introduce themselves to the group, sharing their name and one other thing (eg what they love about their work, what they hope to get out of the day etc). Repeat until everyone has introduced themselves and there are no more chairs!

Physically active and fun games

Human Rock Paper Scissors: Rather than just using our hands to select rock, paper or scissors, participants use their bodies. It becomes a fun group activity when people begin in pairs, and the person who does not win the round stands behind the person that does. Each pair then plays against another pair, with the non-winners standing behind winners and so on, until eventually there two huge teams left. Hint: be sure that you can quickly and easily explain this activity (practise ahead of time) and you’ll want to review, or perhaps even post, the order of which beats what. http://www.ultimatecampresource.com/site/camp-activity/rock-paper-scissors-posse.html

Musical Chairs: with or without the questions as described above!

Reflective activities

objectsThe Object Game: This is one of my absolute favourites. I’m not sure where it comes from (I was first introduced to it about 12 years ago by Nancy Dubois) but you can play it for a variety of purposes. It does make a great introduction piece, or you can use this as a way for participants and the group as a whole to reflect on their work.

  • Place a variety of miscellaneous, ordinary household/office objects on a table (be sure you have 1 for each person plus a few extras and try not to have too many repeats). Items like tape, salt and pepper shakers, a stapler, oven mitts, a lint roller, sticky notes, a coffee cup etc
  • As each person enters the room, have them select an object at random (usually people will pick the object that resonates with them in some way)
  • Sample questions:
    • Have each person introduce themselves and use the object to describe the work that they do.
    • Use the object to describe something that the group has accomplished over the last year, a barrier that’s been overcome
    • Use the object to describe a hope for the future or a vision for the group

 

Impromptu Networking: This is a variation of Walk and Talk that provides space for participants to start thinking big and creatively. http://www.liberatingstructures.com/2-impromptu-networking/

Looking for more ideas?

There is no shortage of icebreakers and active games thanks to the internet. The above is hardly a complete list but rather a collection of some of my favourites that I’ve done several times with groups. Here are a couple of websites with lots more options!

http://www.icebreakers.ws/

http://www.playsport.net/

https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_76.htm

Do you have a favourite icebreaker or game you’d like to share? Use the comment box to tell us about it!

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New Resource: First Steps to FLS Planning

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator
 

One of the things that I get really excited about is the work we do in supporting communities and organizations in engaging Francophone communities and delivering French Language Services. In the course of my work, I regularly get to see people that are very passionate about this topic. However the difference with me is that I’m an Anglophone. So why do I feel so strongly about Francophones being able to access services in French?

There are a few reasons- social justice, equity, legal reasons, I work in a bilingual organization and see the importance of it every day etc – all good reasons. My reason is a personal one. A few years ago, inspired by the work that I had been doing in the topic, I decided to take French classes to regain the French skills that I had learned as a child growing up in Quebec. Soon I was faced with the intense frustration that comes from knowing what I wanted to say, but not having the words to be able to say it French, and my own fears about being misunderstood and judged for my lack of ability in French.

I can’t imagine what that would be like when faced with a health or social services emergency, or even something as simple as trying to explain myself at a Services Ontario office in French…..My own personal experience hammered home the importance of Franco-Ontarians being able to access services in their own language.

That is what has inspired me to co-create – first with former colleague Estelle Duchon, and now with my colleague Patrick Delorme- a series of webinars and resources designed to boost the confidence and capacity of Anglophone organizations to engage with Francophone audiences and deliver French Language Services (FLS).

Our latest offering is a webinar presented in June and now a resource called First Steps to Planning French Language Services, available in both English and French. In the resources, Patrick and I outline the reasons for providing services in French, four steps to planning and delivering FLS, and a few key principles.

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We hope that this resource- and our past resources such as “How to engage Francophones when you don’t speak French!”- will help you and your organization in your FLS efforts. We’d love to hear more about your experiences, and of course if we can provide support to you, please connect with us!

Helpful Resources from HC Link

This new resource, Getting Started With……Planning French Language Services lists all of HC Link’s existing resources on FLS and engaging and working with Francophones.

Helpful Resources from our Members and Partners

HR Support Kit: Pathway to Bilingual Services developed by Risfssso

Moving towards a bilingual organization developed by Health Nexus and Reflet Salveo

Ontario 400 Website celebrating 400 of Francophone presence in Ontario

 

 

 

 
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A cool tool for reviewing development plans

Reporting live from HC Link’s biannual conference Linking for Healthy Communities!

There is strong evidence that community design encourages- or discourages- physical activity. We need to plan and design our communities in ways that increase physical activity opportunities. Public and community health can play a role by assessing development plans to ensure that they do meet the physical activity needs of your community.

In 2013, the Middlesex-London Health Unit developed a toolkit as an outcome of an active communities project. In today’s workshop, Bernie McCall from MLHU and Kim Bergeron, the writer of the toolkit, provided an overview of the toolkit and provided an opportunity for participants to apply some of its steps. The toolkit provides a standardized approach to assessing the 3 main types of development plans: area plans (for neighbourhoods or districts), subdivision plans (for subdivisions!) and site plans (for a single parcel of land).

Excitingly, many of the folks in the workshop had already read and/or applied the toolkit in their community work. Future plans for the toolkit include case studies and validating it to determine its effectiveness. I hope that we hear more about this excellent resource and how it’s being used! Check out #Link4HC to read more about this workshop.

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Powerful Statistics + Emotional Stories: My One Thing

Reporting live from HC Link’s biannual conference Linking for Healthy Communities!

This morning’s keynote speaker was David Courtemanche from Leading Minds Inc. David is the perfect person to talk to us about policy change as he not only has a background in community work and the not-for-profit word, he is also a former politician. In that way he bridges both worlds, or in his words, he knows the dark side.

David encouraged us to try to come away from his presentation with ONE Thing that we can take back to our organizations. I think our Twitter hashtag from the conference #Link4HC captures the many points that David touched on, so I’m going to blog about my ONE Thing and that is this:

DavidCourt1

Powerful Statistics + Emotional Stories

As Dave Meslin talked about in his keynote presentation yesterday, we often are reliant on our charts and reports and graphs to make our arguments for us. David Courtemanche often finds that health advocates feel that just brigning forward information will lead to change. He told us the story of a group of local Sudbury activists who were working to make public spaces in Sudbury smoke free, including the local hockey arena. The group had research, studies, made deputations and presentations. What turned the argument into a successful council decision however was a 10 year old boy who spoke after all of the deputees had finished their presentations. He told the council that he loved hockey and that he really wanted to see the Sudbury Wolves play at the local arena, but as an asthma sufferer, he couldn’t enter the arena as the second hand smoke made him sick.

The next day, it was the story of the 10 year old with asthma that made the local papers. Not the stacks of reports and the pie charts.

The following week council passed a smoke-free bylaw, making public spaces in Sudbury- restaurants, buildings, and yes the arena- smoke free.

Yesterday Dave Meslin gave us several examples of campaigns that turned numbers into stories that captured the attention of the media.

This is the ONE Thing that I’ll be taking forward with me as I return to my desk on Monday: how can I pair my stats and numbers with stories to bring emotion, attention and change?

DavidCourt2

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Actively Offering Services in French

Reporting live from HC Link’s biannual conference Linking for Healthy Communities!

I’m really passionate about French Language Services (FLS). The interesting thing about my passion for FLS is that I’m not a Francophone. Rather I’m an Anglophone that has been working for the past few years to improve my French. And that’s actually why I’m so passionate about supporting organizations to deliver services in French: I know firsthand how challenging and frustrating it is to know what you want to say, but to not have the words to express yourself. When it comes to health services, it’s not only frustrating but can actually affect patient outcomes. When it comes to health advice, treatment or medications it is critical that the patient understands fully. And for Ontario’s Francophones, that means being able to access services in French.

In this afternoon’s workshop, Lynn Brouilette from Consortium National de Formation en Santé introduced the concept of Active Offer and shared some of the work that CNFS is doing to support health organizations and professionals to actively offer FLS. Then Patrick Delorme shared a new English toolkit, developed by Health Nexus and the Toronto Central LHIN, which provides a simple methodology for organizations to develop Active Offer.

There is a fine line between offering FLS and the Active Offer of FLS. Active Offer goes beyond simply making services available in French and ensures that all clients know- before they even have to ask- that high quality and reliable services are available to them in French. In this workshop, we heard about two organizations working in Active Offer.

When it comes to FLS, we often wonder if we should take a chicken or egg approach to FLS services: should we offer them first, or should we wait for demand? Research shows us that Francophones often don’t ask for services in French. We need to make it clear that services are available – whether asked for or not.

Anglophones can also be involved in Active Offer! By offering just a couple of words in French (even “Bonjour” or “Bienvenue”) communicates that clients have a choice of English or French. If they choose French, the appropriate French speaking staff can then be brought into the conversation.

Now, on to Health Nexus’ French reception to celebrate Francophones and French Services! We look forward to seeing you there!

 

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What do I do now? Communicating evaluation results for action

Reporting live from HC Link’s biannual conference Linking for Healthy Communities!

This afternoon I attended an excellent session on communicating evaluation results, delivered by Laura Bellissimo and Allison Meserve from Public Health Ontario. Now, in the spirit of full disclosure, I'm one of those health promoters that struggles to find evaluation interesting. I know it's important, and I always want it incorporated into everything that I do, but preferably by other people. However this workshop kept my attention the whole time, which is impressive given that it was right after lunch and the bread pudding at the BMO Institute for Learning is exceptional!

What I loved about this session is that it really made us all think about the communications aspect of evaluating, something that may not always be considered. We evaluate because we must, or because we want to ensure that our program works and is effective. We also want to be accountable to our stakeholders and funders. No one, wisely said Allison, conducts an evaluation for the purpose of writing a report.

It is interesting then, given the efforts that we put into not only designing and delivering the program/initiative but also the evaluation itself, that we don't always communicate results. Or if we do, it's in a way that resonates only to academics and government.

Allison and Laura gave us four key things to think about when designing our evaluation strategy:

Communicate results throughout the evaluation: This ensures that your stakeholders will find the results credible and increases the chances that they will use the results. Your final evaluation should not contain any surprises!

Consider various audience characteristics: Clearly identify who your stakeholders are and what methods of communication work best for them. Think about their familiarity with the program, their reading level, their attitude towards the program and their role in decision making.

Clearly define your communication objectives to successfully communicate your evaluation results: Determine why you want to communicate, to whom you want to direct your messages, and what you want to communicate.

Lots of options beyond a report: Think about social media, mass media, info graphics, poetry, theatre, and professional channels.

One thing that often arises when communicating evaluation results is what to do when the results are negative (or perceived as negative). The impulse might be to not share results that are negative. However, cautioned Allison, if we do not communicate these results, you do your stakeholders a disservice. Others can’t learn from your work if you don’t share it!

So, regardless of the results of your evaluation, communicating those results is critical for accountability, learning and transferability. Be sure to consider not only what and how you will evaluate, but how you will tell people about the results.

Now, go forth and evaluate. And brag about it!

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Active Offer

HC Link has been involved with building the capacity of organizations to deliver French Language Services for several years. You might already be familiar with some of the resources and webinars we’ve delivered on this topic. That’s just one of the reasons that I’m excited that Patrick Delorme will be presenting at our upcoming HC Link Conference! Patrick has been working with Health Nexus and Toronto Central LHIN to develop the Active Offer Toolkit: a practical guide to clear and effective French Language Services.


What I like about the Active Offer approach is that it is proactive: rather than waiting for clients to ask for services in French, the organization initiates offering FLS. Clients know that services are available to them in French, and that French services are the same quality as English ones.


The toolkit itself is straight forward and practical. It is based around six steps, each with detailed purpose statements and examples. The 6 steps are built around four key factors for success: commitment, collaboration, communication and competencies. Without the Four Cs, active offer cannot become a reality.

activeofferblog

 

Patrick’s workshop will be on November 12th at 3 pm. Patrick will be presenting in English and there will be simultaneous translation available into French.  In the workshop, Patrick will talk about the concept of active offer, the benefits to providing services in French, and provide an overview of the  toolkit. Participants will then have the chance to work in small groups to actually apply the ACTIVE steps and think about how their organizations have strengthen their Active Offer practices. Patrick has been working in the field of FLS and active offer for several years and has a great deal of experience and expertise to share.

I’ll be moderating this workshop at the HC Link Conference and I hope to see you there!

Do you have any tips, tricks or challenges relating to French Language Services that you’d like to share? Leave us a comment!

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Setting Priorities: How do we decide what to do?

Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

As soon as I hear the term “priority setting” my mind jumps to the tools or processes we can use to determine priorities. Dot-mocracy, anyone? But in doing some research on this topic to prepare for an upcoming consultation, I was reminded that there are a few more things that go into priority-setting than simply picking out the options that sound good.

Why set priorities?

First of all, setting priorities allows us to focus our efforts on what we can realistically achieve that will have impact. Otherwise, all issues seem important and we end up overworked, under resourced and run the risk of not accomplishing our goals.

In my opinion, a very critical step here is to make sure that you have a solid sense of what it is the group wants achieve together. It could be a vision statement, a goal, a mandate or a strategic priority- it doesn’t matter too much what you call it- it matters that the group has agreed on some kind of a statement of purpose that answers the question “what is it that we want to ACHIEVE as a result of our work?” This statement becomes an important touchstone that should help guide you in all decision-making moving forward.

At the prioritizing stage in the process, the community group/organization has already engaged in some research and planning conversations, and has identified or brainstormed a range of options for activities, initiatives or programs to pursue. Now it’s time to move from “blue sky thinking” to what the group can realistically achieve together.

How do we set priorities?

This excellent article from Health Promotion Capacity Building Services (HPCB) at Public Health Ontario (formerly THCU) outlines a simple, 3 step process for setting priorities BEFORE you begin:

  1. Identify criteria on which to compare options
  2. Select processes to vote/score/rank
  3. Clarify roles/ processes to make the final choice

Identify criteria

As a group, determine what criteria you’ll use to compare options and make decisions about what initiatives/activities/programs the group will move forward with. For example:

Fit with mandate/vision Urgency
Resources required Feasibility
Impact Reach
Importance Community need

This step allows us to identify how we’ll know what’s important. Otherwise we risk using the “ooooh sparkly thing!” method of prioritizing, which means we drop whatever we’re doing in favour of the new, shiny thing.

Select process to vote

Once you have your criteria, it’s time to talk tools. The tool you select will depend on the nature of your work, the type of group you’re working with and the time you have for the exercise.

Dotmocracy is a multi-voting technique. In its simplest form, you provide participants with one to three dots (usually stickers) and invite them to place a dot beside their top one to three options.

Paired comparisons is a snapshot process to be used with small to mid-sized groups to help narrow options further after dotmocracy.

Quadrant analysis is useful if you have two clear criteria upon which to make a decision (for example, effort and impact), and those two criteria can be qualified in a dichotomous way (for example, high versus low). The use of specific criteria means it is a slightly more rigorous and time-consuming method than the two previously described methods.

Grid analysis is useful when you must or might have to defend your program decisions with ample evidence. Also known as a decision matrix analysis, it is a great process for when you have many criteria.

Clarify roles/processes

At some point in time (hopefully, at the end of this process) the group is going to make a decision about how to move forward. It’s important to outline - before you actually begin your decision-making process - the roles and expectations of the group. For example, is the group making the decision, or are they making a recommendation that is going to another power authority? Is there someone in the group that has decision-making power?

Go forth and make decisions

Now that you have your vision, you’ve identified options and you’ve determined how to identify your priorities, you can go forth and start to make decisions as a group. Warning: this can be a slightly messy process. Acknowledge that this can be tricky, and create an open space for people to share their opinions and ideas. Having an external and neutral facilitator can be very helpful.

Good luck!

Resources

Setting Community Priorities Presentation. HC Link 2010

Priority Setting- Four methods for getting to what’s important. OHPE Feature article 2010

Priority Setting Process Checklist. PHO 2011

Focus on What’s Important. County Health Rankings & Roadmaps

Do you have tools, resources and/or experiences to share? Use the comment box to tell us your ideas!

 
 
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Webinar Recap: First Steps to FLS Planning

Recently HC Link presented the latest webinar in its French Language Services (FLS) Capacity Building series. We have delivered a number of these, on topics such as creating a bilingual organizational culture, recruiting and retaining bilingual staff, and engaging Francophone communities. While we’ve heard that this information is helpful, we’ve also heard that organizations need to get a better sense of where to START when planning FLS. To that end, we developed a new webinar called “First Steps to Planning French Language Services”, and will release a resource on the same topic later this summer.

Planning to deliver FLS can seem overwhelming, particularly if your organization is new to working in French/with Francophone communities. One of the important overarching principles to keep in mind is that you can start small, and grow delivery of French services over time. It’s also critical to work closely with partner organizations (be they Anglophone, bilingual or Francophone) who have close relationships with Francophone communities and deliver services in French.

Keeping those two things in mind, here are a few of the necessary steps to keep in mind as you begin your FLS journey. These steps will be expanded on in our upcoming resource on this topic.

FLS Planning Graphic

First Steps in FLS Planning Slides | Recording

Helpful Resources from HC Link

This new resource, Getting Started With……Planning French Language Services lists all of HC Link’s existing resources on FLS and engaging and working with Francophones.

Helpful Resources from our Members and Partners

HR Support Kit: Pathway to Bilingual Services developed by Risfssso

Moving towards a bilingual organization developed by Health Nexus and Reflet Salveo

Ontario 400 Website celebrating 400 of Francophone presence in Ontario

 

 

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Webinar Recap- How to Engage Francophones – when you don’t speak French!

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link

For many people working in the areas of community-based planning, health promotion and healthy communities, we want to fully engage and work with all of the people who live, work and play in our community. When it comes to working with the Francophone community many feel that this can only be done if we are fluent in French. This week, Sylvie Boulet and I delivered a webinar, How to Engage Francophones- when you don't speak French, for the Physical Activity Resource Centre (PARC). A wide variety of physical activity promoters in Ontario attended the session- 78% of whom spoke a little or no French.

There are many reasons why organizations and groups would want to engage with Francophone communities and deliver services in French. Sometimes these reasons are legal ones or have to do with funding mandates. Most importantly however is to consider that if we want our programs, services and initiatives to improve the health of our communities we must consider the health status and needs of Francophones. Franco-Ontarians tend to have lower levels of self-reported health and feel less a part of their communities than their Anglophone counterparts. Franco-Ontarians are also more likely to eat fewer fruits vegetables and more likely to smoke and drink alcohol. There is clear evidence that Francophones who receive information, supports and services in French follow advice and instructions more closely and have fewer follow-up visits and re-admissions.

The reasons for engaging Francophones and delivering services in French are clear, but HOW to do it, particularly if your organization lacks French capacity, is a bit fuzzier. In our webinar and companion resource we lay out three easy steps to engage Francophones regardless of your French capacity.

Step One: Examine Your Motives: be very clear about the purpose and objectives for your engagement strategy, and also have a plan in place for what you will do with the results. The Francophone community tends to be over consulted, and it's not always clear if/how the resulting data is used.

Step Two: Understand Francophone Contexts in Ontario, your community and your organization: understand the history and contexts of the community as well as the history of your organization's past engagement strategies. This history may have an impact (positive or negative) on relationships and results.

Step Three: Find people to work with: For many of us who don't have the capacity or comfort to work in French, this step is really key. Are there colleagues in your organization or networks that have the capacity to liaise with communities in French? Also investigate existing networks and initiatives that you could partner with. Take the time to establish a trust relationship with new partners as well as with the communities themselves.

Have you experienced successes or challenges in engaging Francophone communities in your work? Please leave us a comment and tell us about it!

View webinar slides

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Webinar Recap - Health in All Policies: Ways to facilitate and model intersectoral collaboration

Andrea Bodkin, HC Link

This morning I co-presented a webinar with Kim Bergeron of Health Promotion Capacity Building at Public Health Ontario. We had a terrific crowd join us to talk about the importance of working intersectorally in a Health in All Policies approach.

I was excited about this topic for three reasons. Firstly it was great to work with Kim on this! Secondly, I think that the Health in All Policies approach is critical when we're looking at building healthy communities. So many of the policies that affect health lay outside of the health sector: everything from economic development, housing, transportation, education and many others impact the health of citizens and communities. Thirdly, it's for this very reason that we must work intersectorally: we must engage with the sectors outside of health who affect the policies that impact health.

Kim and I have been working in the areas of policy development and intersectoral collaboration for many years. When we started talking about some of the ways that facilitate this kind of collaboration, we decided to put them into a bit of a process or framework.

 
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This isn't exactly a step-by-step process or map, rather it's a collection of the things that we've found to be important when working collaboratively. First of all, it's vital to get folks around the same table – whether it's a new or existing table, a real one or virtual one- just having everyone together creates opportunities for dialogue, synergy and collaboration. Using the Stakeholder Wheel can be helpful to identify who to bring to the table and in what capacity. In the course of those dialogues, develop a collective understanding of the problem or issue you are trying to address and potential solutions. From that, create a vision or goal statement capturing what you want to happen as a result of working together: what is the change that you want to see? I really like the exercise "1-2-4-all" from Liberating Structures as a way to create a collective vision. Creating a document to capture your collective understanding, vision, roles and responsibilities and scope of the project is an important way to ensure that all partners are on the same page and have committed to the project. A Terms of Reference or project charter can help. Tailoring key messages for particular audiences, including "what, so what, now what" and the actions that you want them to take is also important.

I'd love to hear your experiences of working intersectorally in the area of policy! What worked well for you? Did you experience challenges? What happened as a result of your collaboration? Use the comment box below to share your stories.

 

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Webinar Recap: Taking a bite out of HEAL policies

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link

This week we held the fourth-and last- webinar in our policy development webinar series. A group of very enthusiastic folks from Ottawa joined us to talk about their experience in implementing Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) guidelines in municipal daycare centres from start to finish: Helen Parker and Ellen Lakusiak from Ottawa Public Health, Ginette Perron from the City of Ottawa, and Fadi Chouhaibar, chef from Centre Educatif Beausoleil.

The impetus for the HEAL guidelines came from the municipality: they approached Ottawa Public Health for their support in developing and implementing the guidelines. The guidelines were developed under the guidance of a multi-disciplinary advisory committee informed by a literature review. The guidelines were then implemented in municipal daycare centres.

Often times, I think that we put a lot of energy into the development stage of policy development: identifying the policy issue, building community and stakeholder support, identifying policy options. This webinar focussed on the implementation of the guidelines: staff from Ottawa Public Health were seconded to provide support to daycare centres; a variety of training and sharing opportunities were held; parent engagement strategies used to garner support; a comprehensive evaluation plan identified changes made as a result of the policy; a sustainability plan was developed. It reminded me that getting a policy developed and adopted isn't the goal: getting it implemented is.

The presenters identified three main drivers for the successful implementation of the HEAL guidelines:

  1. The partnership between the municipality and public health: the municipality approached public health and asked for their participation in developing and implementing HEAL guidelines. Support for the guidelines within the child care centres was already there.
  2. Parents: a cornerstone of the implementation of the HEAL guidelines was open communication and sharing with parents through newsletters and conversations. Parents became engaged in what was happening at their child's centre: asking for recipes, sending in photos of their kids being active at home etc.
  3. Political will

The HEAL guidelines have been successfully implemented in all municipal child care centres in Ottawa. Next, Ottawa Public Health hopes to implement the guidelines in community centres and has their eye on home-based centres as well!

To learn more, check out the recording and slides from this webinar.

Review resources from previous policy development webinars.

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Happy World Toilet Day!

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link

I will readily and proudly admit that I am a bit of a public health geek. And of the things that I get most geeky about is public sanitation. Clean water and toilets. I have always been passionate about this issue, but became even more so when I travelled in India. There is nothing like a little trip to India to make you appreciate sanitation. My second day of my first trip in India I saw local people dumping their garbage in the Ganges: Mother Ganga, the holiest river in India is a garbage can.

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Mother Ganga in Rishikesh, India, taken by Andrea Bodkin

One of the highlights of my second trip was my visit to the International Toilet Museum, which along with an interesting collection of western-style toilets from around the world, has a display of various toilet systems that can be installed in rural India. Fascinating!

toilet blog picture 2

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Sulabh International Toilet Musem, Delhi, India, taken by Andrea Bodkin

World Toilet Day was this week (yes this is a thing, and yes despite my aforementioned love of the topic I missed it) so in honour of it, here are a few facts:

  • Sanitation is widely regarded as one of the most important accomplishments in public health. The ancient Roman viaducts are often referred to as the world first public health intervention.
  • 40% of the world's population does not have access to toilets, and 15% of the world's population practices open defecation.
  • In 2013, 1000 children died every day from diarrhoeal diseases as a result of poor sanitation.
  • Lack of sanitation impacts girls' educations: many girls miss out on school because of the lack of clean and safe water and toilets.
  • Lack of sanitation has economic impacts in time, productivity and health costs. It's estimated that every $1 spent on water and sanitation generates a return of $8.

If you're curious about sanitation, its effect on health, and what needs to be done about it, check out www.worldtoilet.org (yes it's a thing!) and listen to this 17 minute podcast from the BBC on World Toilet Day http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/worldservice/bizdaily/bizdaily_20141119-1027a.mp3

And above all, appreciate the water from your tap, your clean bathroom and flushing toilet. In this world it is a privilege not to be taken for granted.

 

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Webinar Recap: Working with Elected Officials: Tools and Techniques

By Andrea Bodkin, HC Link Coordinator

This afternoon I moderated the 3rd in our series of 4 webinars on the topic of policy development. Since municipal elections were held all across Ontario this week, what better topic than building relationships with elected officials?

I was joined by Nicole Niedra-Boirdi from Niagara Region Public Health, my colleague at HC Link Gillian Kranias, and Krista Long and Sara Haalboon from Waterloo's Food Spaces, Vibrant Spaces campaign. Our speakers discussed two important- and closely linked- concepts: identifying the priorities of municipalities and elected officials; and using storytelling as a way to engage them.

First off, Nicole shared a variety of tools that Healthy Living Niagara has developed to identify how the priorities of the region/municipality intersect with its priorities. Mapping out the municipalities' strategic plan, analyzing minutes of past council meetings and mapping media coverage are a part of this process. This information can be used to identify common goals, identify potential partners, frame issues and identify gaps/unique needs.

Next, Gillian, Krista and Sara shared their experiences with using storytelling and public narrative in Waterloo. Their campaign, around community gardens, food access and farmer's markets, had a website, social media campaign and outreach events, but a cornerstone was on using volunteers in each ward to meet with candidates running in that ward. Volunteers were trained in storytelling to bring their personal approach to the issue- alleviating the fear that many volunteers had that they were not "experts". By speaking from their experience, the conversation between the volunteers and candidates was opened up, allowing candidates to connect with what the volunteer was saying. Candidates could see how the issue of community gardens aligned with their platform issues of community building, safe spaces and elder care.

I am a political junkie- I love politics. I will admit though that the 10 month long municipal election campaign exhausted me! Today's webinar energized me, and made me think about what I can do as a private citizen (not just a health promoter) to bring the issues that I care about forward to my local council.

If you'd like to learn more- check out the slides and recording from the webinar!

You can also view the slides and recordings from Part 1 and Part 2 of the policy development webinar series.

Resources

Building Community Policy Tools on Healthy Living Niagara's Website:
http://healthylivingniagara.com/building-community-policy/

Food Spaces, Vibrant Spaces WR Website:
http://www.wrfoodsystem.ca/foodspacesWR

HC Link's online Policy Learning Community:
http://hclinkpolicylearningcommunity.ning.com/

HC Link's February 2014 Peer Sharing session Engaging the Power of Story:
http://www.hclinkontario.ca/index.php/events/slides-from-events.html/#PowerOfStory

Marshall Ganz (Harvard University) articles and media clips about storytelling and the Public Narrative approach are on his website:
http://marshallganz.com/

How Storytelling Affects the Brain:
http://www.visualistan.com/2014/05/the-science-of-storytelling-infographic.html

Pamela Rutledge (University of California and Fielding Graduate University) article in Psychology Today: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/positively-media/201101/the-psychological-power-storytelling

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